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  1. #1

    Consider meat rabbits

    We've been raising rabbits for meat. Here's some reasons to consider this:
    Then check out my blog, I'll be posting about how we started & what we learned:
    http://singlemompreparedness.blogspot.com

    Rabbit is lower in % of fat than chicken, turkey, beef, and pork. (U S D A circular # 549)

    5 The office of home economics, state relations of the U S Department of Agriculture has made extensive test and have stated that domestic rabbit meat is the most nutritious meat known to man.

    Rabbit meat is seasonal any month of the year and is especially recommended during the hot summer months, as it does not contain the heating properties of most all other meats.

    A doe rabbit that weighs 10 pounds can produce 320 pounds of meat in a year. !!! WOW !!!. This is more than a cow and it takes 2 acres of land to raise a cow.

    Rabbits will produce 6 pounds of meat on the same feed and water as a cow will produce 1 pound of meat on the same feed and water.

    Easy to butcher & clean.
    Feed them your weeds & they give you fertilizer.Droppings can be used immediately for fertilizer, no aging necessary.

    Pelts can be used for a variety of purposes. It is very warm.

    Angora rabbits can be raised, their hair cut, spun, & used like wool. It's actually warmer than wool.

    "I could never kill a rabbit". Reconsider, & think about what you would actually be willing to do to keep your family fed.

    In the depression people fed their rabbits on grass clippings & lived on the meat.

    Don't take up much space & are low maintenance & quiet.

    Rabbits are "meal sized" so you don't have to worry about preserving a lot of meat.

    Places to learn more about meat rabbits:
    www.raisingmeatrabbits.com
    www.raisingrabbitsformeat.com

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Talkeetna, Alaska
    Posts
    14
    I remember growing up that we only killed and ate wild rabbit during months with an "R" in them - in other words, during the colder months. Something to do with trichinosis or brucellosis - I can't remember.

    Anyway, when you say, "Rabbit meat is seasonal any month of the year and is especially recommended during the hot summer months, as it does not contain the heating properties of most all other meats." are you saying domestic rabbits don't get whatever disease that wild rabbits get?

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    California
    Posts
    58
    This is some very interesting info. I'll be checking back to see how it turns out.
    Stay Sharp!

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Mt.Gilead NC
    Posts
    549
    Thanks I think I will look into getting some rabbits
    Robert W
    "The Democracy Will Cease To Exist When You Take Away From Those Who Are Willing To Work And Give to Those Who Are Not." -Thomas Jefferson

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Central California
    Posts
    4
    I'm not yulebean but from what I understand, as long as your domestic rabbits do not have any contact with wild rabbits they will not get tularemia or other issues common within the wild rabbits. What I'm curious about is people's opinions about what breed they like. I know the larger ones (like California Rabbit) are more bone than meat.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Appalachian Mountains
    Posts
    165
    I thought about raising rabbits, or possibly chickens, in inclosures, I'm afraid it wouldn't
    work here, I'm near the top of a mountain, and am presently trying to deal with a problem
    with black snakes. I don't know if their edible.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    11

    www.growing-self-reliance.com -- rabbits for sale?

    Yulebean, I'm going to check out your blog.

    And I have a question:

    We just purchased 2 acres and I've been really thinking about raising rabbits as an extra form of "sustainability". But I'm also wondering if we could sell them for meat. Does your blog address this issue?
    Thanks,
    Karen
    www.growing-self-reliance.com
    Last edited by Karen; 08-03-2011 at 04:18 AM.

  8. #8
    A fine mesh will keep the black snakes out of the rabbit cages, but if they can see them they will get scared (the rabbits not the snakes).
    The other things that work end in ga. like 12 ga, 20 ga. and the like....

  9. #9
    Snakes are also edible, but they really don't taste anything like chicken.

    If you buy rabbits to raise for meat, pleasepleaseplease buy rabbits from a good mother. Bad mother rabbits eat their babies. Messily. The daughters of bad mother rabbits eat their babies even if raised by a good mother rabbit. Never, ever send a small child outside to see if Sonya has had her babies yet.

    Also, make sure at least seven babies survived from the litter your rabbit was born into.

    Rabbits urinate in the corners, except that some males will squirt any person walking by. Normally, though, the stuff drips down the corner posts. Yes, it stinks something awful if you don't keep turning the ground or covering it. This is a good reason to hang your cages. The urine will poison any bed of worms you try to raise under the cages, but if you can get a worm bin small enough not to catch the urine, you might have something going.

    If you have a hot, humid climate, keeping your rabbits cool enough to keep the male fertile can be a challenge. Expect to see molding fur.

    When you breed them, pop the female into the male's cage. The lady's first impulse is to defend her turf, but a guy has a whole different focus on life.

    Some of the guys announce they're finished with the breeding process by rearing up and screaming, then falling over on their sides. Don't charge too much for the tickets, now.

    Don't assume that if you know how to cook chicken or pork, you know how to cook rabbit. It's different. Turning out something dry, tasteless, and stringy is all too easy.
    Last edited by cat-herder; 08-21-2011 at 12:59 PM.

  10. #10
    I haven't tried selling the meat. I have had great luck selling live rabbits. I do think if things get hard, it would be easy to sell the meat.

 

 

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