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o123456
07-23-2011, 01:07 PM
once you open a can of freeze dried or dehydrated food how long will it last if sealed in a vaccum storage container?

Grainlady
07-24-2011, 12:55 PM
Vacuum-sealing the food will extend it's shelf-life, but probably not as long as when it was processed with an oxygen absorber in the can. You can also use a canning jar and an oxygen absorber in it if you don't have a FoodSaver. Oxygen-free storage is always going to extend storage time, along with keeping it out of light and at a cool temperature (70F or colder).

Personally, I try to use foods I open, divide and vacuum-seal in canning jars, within one year of processing it. I've done this for many years now and it has worked very well. Nothing like having freeze-dried peach slices turn into a rubbery mass all fused together!!! Or a food item you don't use often (like freeze-dried blackberries or freeze-dried shredded cheddar cheese) go to waste. Vacuum-sealing it in jars will help eliminate the waste.

I use powdered whole eggs when they are less expensive per egg than fresh eggs, but it takes me a long time to use that amount (approximately 80 eggs per #10 can). I divide the powder into pint jars, and using the jar attachment I vacuum-seal a canning lid on the jars and place them back into storage. Another thing about using powdered whole eggs is that in many recipes I can get by with just 1/2 an egg (or use 1 T. egg powder + 2 T. water to equal 1/2 egg) and get the same results and even more savings. If I want to make 1/2 a recipe of something (like muffins - make 6 instead of 12), I'll use powdered eggs to make 1/2 an egg.

Hope that helps you out...

Spaceman
07-24-2011, 06:44 PM
Yes! In addition to Grainlady's informative post, not only does it keep oxygen out, it also keeps moisture from entering your food. The plastic lids available on #10 cans will allow moisture to enter your food product. This also allows for refrigerating or freezing of the product in the canning jars as well, if your storage area get too hot in summer, extending the life of the product. Canning jars are not for freezing, but I have, with FD & Dehydrated products that do not expand.

Another benefit is you can access your supply over & over and just reseal the jar without using additional oxygen absorbers. I currently store my oxygen absorbers in canning jars till they are needed. I would advise you not to use the screw-on lid rings with the canning jars as this can in some cases cause the seal to break. A few food products can release gases that can cause a sealed canning jar to lose it's seal over time. If not using the item regularly, check the seals occasionally.

One last benefit is you can premix items for soup's, muffin or bread mix, etc. and store in canning jars for quick use from the kitchen. The canning jars are available in various sizes like, half-pint, pint, quart, and two quart. And there are two size mouth openings, wide mouth & the smaller standard opening. You can get both jar sealers for these jars.

Highly recommend vacuum-sealing. Like FoodSaver products!

kathya
11-02-2011, 12:12 AM
[Personally, I try to use foods I open, divide and vacuum-seal in canning jars, within one year of processing it. I've done this for many years now and it has worked very well. Nothing like having freeze-dried peach slices turn into a rubbery mass all fused together!!! Or a food item you don't use often (like freeze-dried blackberries or freeze-dried shredded cheddar cheese) go to waste. Vacuum-sealing it in jars will help eliminate the waste.

I use powdered whole eggs when they are less expensive per egg than fresh eggs, but it takes me a long time to use that amount (approximately 80 eggs per #10 can). I divide the powder into pint jars, and using the jar attachment I vacuum-seal a canning lid on the jars and place them back into storage. Another thing about using powdered whole eggs is that in many recipes I can get by with just 1/2 an egg (or use 1 T. egg powder + 2 T. water to equal 1/2 egg) and get the same results and even more savings. If I want to make 1/2 a recipe of something (like muffins - make 6 instead of 12), I'll use powdered eggs to make 1/2 an egg.

Hope that helps you out...[/QUOTE]

I'm having a little trouble with this as freeze dried in part seems to be interchanged with dehydrated and from what i know they are not the same.

Grainlady
11-02-2011, 06:53 AM
I'm having a little trouble with this as freeze dried in part seems to be interchanged with dehydrated and from what i know they are not the same.

I guess you could think of it as dry goods. You can purchase freeze-dried, dried (powdered), and dehydrated foods in #10 cans. For instance, powdered eggs, powdered butter/margarine/shortening, powdered milk, are dried, not freeze-dried. You can also purchase dehydrated fruit/vegetables in #10 cans (and you can also dehydrate at home), which are processed differently than freeze-dried, and it would also store better once opened if you could vacuum-seal it.

The biggest difference between freeze-dried and dehydrated foods is that you can rehydrate freeze-dried foods in a few minutes using hot water, while dehydrated foods take either a long soak, or a long amount of time cooking to rehydrate them.

beaniemaster2
12-03-2011, 06:31 PM
Food bags vs Vacume sealing jars? I have a FoodSaver on the way and I am not sure whether to put my stuff in bags or jars? What do you find works best, is there any difference or does it just depend on what you are packing? I did so appreciate your hint on putting a coffee filter over finely powder stuff in jars in another post Grainlady!
I am also planning to dehydrate more instead of canning although I understand it does not keep as long. If it is vacume packed, does it last anywhere nearly as long as what we buy in cans?

Grainlady
12-09-2011, 10:32 AM
Food bags vs Vacume sealing jars? I have a FoodSaver on the way and I am not sure whether to put my stuff in bags or jars? What do you find works best, is there any difference or does it just depend on what you are packing? I did so appreciate your hint on putting a coffee filter over finely powder stuff in jars in another post Grainlady!
I am also planning to dehydrate more instead of canning although I understand it does not keep as long. If it is vacume packed, does it last anywhere nearly as long as what we buy in cans?

I like canning jars for dry goods because you can use them over and over. But saying that, all my grains/seeds/beans (well over a thousand pounds total) are stored in vacuum-sealed bags and placed in plastic storage boxes. I've used this method since I first got a FoodSaver in 1986.

There are some foods you can't vacuum-seal and store at room temperature - brown sugar and anything that has 10% or more moisture in it due to the potential for bacteria growth. Most dehydrated vegetables can be vacuum-sealed, but there is too much moisture remaining in most dehydrated fruit to safely vacuum-seal it. Just place it in an air-tight container and keep it in dark, cool storage. Take time to read the user-manual before using your FoodSaver.

beaniemaster2
12-10-2011, 12:31 AM
[QUOTE=Grainlady;4311]I like canning jars for dry goods because you can use them over and over. But saying that, all my grains/seeds/beans (well over a thousand pounds total) are stored in vacuum-sealed bags and placed in plastic storage boxes. I've used this method since I first got a FoodSaver in 1986.

There are some foods you can't vacuum-seal and store at room temperature - brown sugar and anything that has 10% or more moisture in it due to the potential for bacteria growth. Most dehydrated vegetables can be vacuum-sealed, but there is too much moisture remaining in most dehydrated fruit to safely vacuum-seal it. Just place it in an air-tight container and keep it in dark, cool storage. Take time to read the user-manual before using your FoodSaver.[/

Thank you Grainlady! I just dryed some pineapple and sealed it tonight! I will open it right away! I also planned to seal some brown sugar in jars I just got on sale. My manual had NO info on foods not to vacume pack! What other kinds of food is not advised that is considered high moisture? Orange slices is my next project and guess they should not be vacumed either?

beaniemaster2
12-10-2011, 08:29 AM
I opened my jar of pineapple and it is soft and sticky already!!! It seemed really dry!!! Geeeeeeze And I thought canning was a pain! Help?????

beaniemaster2
12-10-2011, 08:33 AM
Forgot to ask if I can dry the pineapple some more??? I don't want to make these mistakes again, fruit is too expensive to do it wrong.

Grainlady
12-10-2011, 12:34 PM
I opened my jar of pineapple and it is soft and sticky already!!! It seemed really dry!!! Geeeeeeze And I thought canning was a pain! Help?????


Oh, yummmmm, dehydrated pineapple is as good as candy it's so concentrated in sugar (dehydrated cantaloupe is another near-candy experience). A real treat!

After the food is "done" drying, allow it to come to room temperature before you transfer it to a container. If you place warm food in the jars and seal them, there will be enough moisture still expelling from the food to cause the stored food to develop mold. On the other hand, don't let dehydrated food sit in a humid kitchen for a number of hours either because it can rehydrate from the moisture in the air.

You need to "condition" the dehydrated food after drying it. "To condition the food before placing it in storage, put the dehydrated food loosely in a large plastic or glass container, about 2/3 full - don't pack it in. Lightly cover and store in a warm, dry, well-ventilated place for 4-10 days. Stir or shake the contents in the containers daily to separate pieces. If beads of moisture form inside, return food to drying trays for more drying, then repeat the conditioning step."

All the steps for proper dehydrating are outlined at sources on-line. If you study the "how-to" first, you will save yourself some grief and trouble, and help to avoid wasted food from improperly drying them.

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/09309.html
http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/dry.html
http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/food/food_safety/preservation/hgic3080.html
http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/food/food_safety/preservation/hgic3084.html
http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/food/food_safety/preservation/hgic3085.html

kathya
12-10-2011, 01:39 PM
I'm not Grainlady but have been getting into dehydrating these last few months and one of the things that i noticed about fruit when looking at the EE catalog is that 95% of it is freeze dried. I figured there has to be a reason for that so I've been sticking with doing veggies and other things. Please do lets us know how it turns out!

beaniemaster2
12-10-2011, 05:40 PM
Thanks guys, great info as always! Going to dry the pineapple somemore then 'condition' it! hahaha My manual that came with it didn't mention this step at all and my book, Making and Using Dried Foods said to put it in jars tightly as soon as cooled and just 'watch' for any signs of moisture or mold. geeeeeze! I always appreciate the links provided here too. I looked at EE catalog and yes most of the fruit is freeze dried! Never noticed that, duh, thanks kathya! Besides fruit and brown sugar, what other foods are high in moisture before I continue my packing? Gee, and I thought dehydrating was going to be easier than canning!

whisper
12-10-2011, 05:41 PM
Thank you grainlady, I never thought about cantalope. I can't wait to try it.

SingleMom
12-15-2011, 03:27 AM
If I buy superpails of eggs and TVP, can I open the buckets, repackage everything in FoodSaver bags, and then put it back in the buckets? Or will that destroy the length of time I can store it?

What I want to do is have several buckets with an assortment of foods in them in case we have to leave and can only grab a couple of them.

Grainlady
12-15-2011, 06:41 AM
If I buy superpails of eggs and TVP, can I open the buckets, repackage everything in FoodSaver bags, and then put it back in the buckets? Or will that destroy the length of time I can store it?

What I want to do is have several buckets with an assortment of foods in them in case we have to leave and can only grab a couple of them.

You may want to contact the company you are purchasing them from for more information. My first thought is - not all foods repack best in a vacuum-sealed bag, and personally, I don't think I'd put powdered eggs in a FoodSaver bag, but mylar bags may work best. I've used powdered whole eggs for many years when they are less expensive per egg than whole shell eggs, but I've always stored them in vacuum-sealed pint canning jars where the powder remains free-flowing (even though it's vacuum-sealed) after I open the #10 can. But these repacked jars of powdered eggs are used within a year.

Second thought - powdered eggs are one of those foods that are more sensitive to storage temperatures, and even in-the-can they tend to alter in flavor and texture the longer they are stored, so I make sure I rotate them out and use them on a regular basis. Stored in the basement, the eggs are stored closest to the floor, away from the warmer ceiling temperatures. If you purchase a superpail of powdered eggs, you'd better start using them once you open them as well as repacking them.

I have another suggestion.... This is the first year I've used OvaEasy whole egg crystals and absolutely love this product for a number of reasons. Traditional whole egg powder clumps like crazy (that's a characteristic of powdered eggs you need to deal with) and you need to sift it before measuring and using. OvaEasy Egg Crystals are a non-clumping crystal. The technology used to make OvaEasy (http://www.nutriom.com/how-we-make-it.html) makes them easier to use, the taste is MUCH improved over traditional methods which are made with a heat process, and OvaEasy have a longer shelf-life. I purchased #10 cans of OvaEasy and each can contains 6 envelopes, and each envelope contains a dozen eggs - which make them user-friendly without having to repack them. You can also purchase them by the 12-egg envelope. The unopened cans store 5-years and the envelopes 18-months. I like OvaEasy so much I donated a case of #10 cans of traditional powdered eggs to a local homeless shelter and replaced them with OvaEasy. You may find this link helpful to see the difference. http://www.nutriom.com/?gclid=CJrQwdOYhK0CFUJjTAodsG_5TA

Not sure about TVP. I consider it poison, not food. It's one of the most highly-processed foods on the planet. I avoid soy as much as possible. Check your local library for a copy of The Whole Soy Story by Kaayla T. Daniel, PhD, CCN.

beaniemaster2
12-15-2011, 12:27 PM
If I buy superpails of eggs and TVP, can I open the buckets, repackage everything in FoodSaver bags, and then put it back in the buckets? Or will that destroy the length of time I can store it?

What I want to do is have several buckets with an assortment of foods in them in case we have to leave and can only grab a couple of them.

That is an excellant idea about the assorted buckets SingleMom, I am going to do that for sure!!! I never saw these products anywhere in buckets, would you mind sharing the company that has them??? I have TVP products in my food storage too as I couldn't afford alot of real meat. I got ham and bacon (to add flavor to my eggs) along with peppers and onions to make Hobo skillets and Beef and Chicken for 'Hamburger Helpers' etc.

I never considered soy to be poison, wow! Soy has always been promoted as a healthy alternative to meat containing alot of protein, amino acids, fiber, omega 3 etc.??? I can't get that book right away, besides possible allergic reactions, what's bad about it???

I looked at those OvaEasy eggs but the cost detered me from buying them, at almost $30 for 6 dozen eggs, it was a real factor in not buying them! Sure sounds like they must taste better though and thanks for the info on storing them, very helpful as usual!

Grainlady
12-15-2011, 01:50 PM
That is an excellant idea about the assorted buckets SingleMom, I am going to do that for sure!!! I never saw these products anywhere in buckets, would you mind sharing the company that has them??? I have TVP products in my food storage too as I couldn't afford alot of real meat. I got ham and bacon (to add flavor to my eggs) along with peppers and onions to make Hobo skillets and Beef and Chicken for 'Hamburger Helpers' etc.

I never considered soy to be poison, wow! Soy has always been promoted as a healthy alternative to meat containing alot of protein, amino acids, fiber, omega 3 etc.??? I can't get that book right away, besides possible allergic reactions, what's bad about it???

I looked at those OvaEasy eggs but the cost detered me from buying them, at almost $30 for 6 dozen eggs, it was a real factor in not buying them! Sure sounds like they must taste better though and thanks for the info on storing them, very helpful as usual!

If you are using eggs for baking, you can use "goop" made out of flax seeds/meal and water, or other egg substitutes. I also have a lot of egg-free recipes I can use. We have to think outside the egg carton and what is "normal". Another benefit using powdered whole eggs in baking, you can often get by with 1/2 an egg instead of using a whole egg, so that's how you can extend that #10 can of powdered whole eggs and get more out of it. But the OvaEasy powdered eggs have a longer, and more stable, shelf life than regular powdered eggs. If all you have after 3 years is only fit to feed to your dog, then it wasn't a good investment at any price.... And that's from someone who has actually used both brands.

You might find some information at Kaayla T. Daniel's blog site helpful: http://blog.wholesoystory.com/

I can make high-protein "wheat meat" with either vital wheat gluten I keep in storage (purchased in #10 cans) or from whole wheat flour (and I keep 3-years worth of wheat in storage).

Some other books to look for at the library or get through Inter-Library Loan:
-How to... Live on Wheat - By John Hill
-How to Make all the Meat You Eat Out of Wheat - by Nina & Michael Shandler
-The Amazing Wheat Book - by LeArta Moulton

I'm going to add this personal story... I have a friend who is an exercise fiend, in her early-50's, in tip-top physical condition and health. She decided to switch to soy milk. Another friend and I tried to convince her otherwise after telling her our problems with soy.... After a couple months she had all kinds of digestive problems and thought it was her gallbladder. Consulted with her physician and had test run and said it wasn't her gallbladder. This went on for about a year and got worse. She went from one doctor to another and nothing helped. Eventually she found a "quack" and he removed her gallbladder, and found out it was perfectly healthy. Continued to drink soy and had the same digestive problems even after gallbladder removal. My friend and I finally convinced her it was the soy milk and begged her to eliminate it for one week. Problem was gone in a few days. That's what soy can do....

SingleMom
12-15-2011, 03:02 PM
Thank you, all. I had concerns about the powdered eggs; maybe I'll just buy a couple of the MyChoice ones for my "group" buckets.

Beanie, Sam's Club has the superpails right now via Augason Farms. That's the only place I've seen them. I don't know about TVP being healthy/unhealthy, but we've been using the #2.5 cans I bought to sample, and I love it! We're not big meat eaters, so they're perfect for tossing into casseroles, chili, or bean soup. It does take time to adapt, though. My daughter got a little carried away with the bacon bits in real eggs, and we all suffered slightly. We used less next time and didn't have any problems.

kathya
12-16-2011, 01:17 AM
Sorry if I'mposting on the wrong thread but I know I've seen it in a couple of places but can't remember where. The comment was to get used to eating your storage now and i think it was refering to dehydrated in paticular otherwise it will play havoc with your digestion. I don't understand why it should though. Why is it any diferenbt than any other prepared or cooked food?

Grainlady
12-16-2011, 03:29 AM
Sorry if I'mposting on the wrong thread but I know I've seen it in a couple of places but can't remember where. The comment was to get used to eating your storage now and i think it was refering to dehydrated in paticular otherwise it will play havoc with your digestion. I don't understand why it should though. Why is it any diferenbt than any other prepared or cooked food?

Kathya-

You bring up some really important points, and you are correct, all food needs to get rotated from long-term storage to your pantry and used. There is a need to take into consideration personal needs - if they have elevated blood pressure they need to check the amount of sodium in foods. This may mean they store more low-sodium ingredients than just-add-water entrees. They would make low-sodium red sauce for pasta (using tomato powder and other pantry ingredients) instead of using a can of spaghetti with meat sauce, or jars/cans of spaghetti sauce which tend to be high in sodium. Avoid cans of Campbell's soup and make soup from scratch using dehydrated vegetables and low-sodium homemade soup mix like Magic Mix - a home storage staple for making lots of things (pudding, Cream of ________ Soup, Alfredo Sauce, even Fudgcicles).

Low-carb foods may be essential for people with blood sugar issues. Due to diabetes in my husband's family, I store a lot of foods from the lower half of the Glycemic Index of Foods Chart in order to help avoid diabetes. I store low-glycemic sweeteners like agave nectar and coconut palm sugar.

Digestion problems can arise if you aren't accustomed to using whole grains and beans. Young children especially have difficulty digesting large amounts of whole grains unless they are prepared properly, including long soaks to neutralize the enzyme inhibitors. Modern man has gotten away from traditional ways to prepare grains/seeds/beans. Many years ago the instructions on the oatmeal box called for an overnight soaking. And oatmeal is a good example where consuming them more frequently can contribute to digestive problems. The bran of oats contain more phytates than almost any other grain and it's important to soak oatmeal, steel-cut oats and oat groats overnight (add a little whey to the soaking water). Frequent consumption of grains high in phytates can lead to mineral losses, allergies and irritation of the intestinal tract. This is something that happened during the 80's when folks went on diets high in oat bran and didn't use traditional methods for preparation. So it's important to know how to properly prepare these foods to avoid that.

Sprouting beans before cooking them will take the gas out of them. Fermenting milk will make a high-lactose food storage product a low-lactose food - important for anyone who has problems digesting milk due to lactose intolerance. That's why I make kefir at home using real kefir grains - which grow and make more for an endless supply of kefir grains. You can't do that with yogurt. Kefir is more nutritious with many health benefits than the plain reconstituted powdered milk.

Gluten intolerance is another issue some people might not know they have until they would have to try to survive on those hundreds of pounds of wheat in storage. I store 30 different grains/seeds/beans - not just wheat, so I can provide gluten-free foods from whole foods in storage.

beaniemaster2
12-16-2011, 06:00 PM
Thank you, all. I had concerns about the powdered eggs; maybe I'll just buy a couple of the MyChoice ones for my "group" buckets.

Beanie, Sam's Club has the superpails right now via Augason Farms. That's the only place I've seen them. I don't know about TVP being healthy/unhealthy, but we've been using the #2.5 cans I bought to sample, and I love it! We're not big meat eaters, so they're perfect for tossing into casseroles, chili, or bean soup. It does take time to adapt, though. My daughter got a little carried away with the bacon bits in real eggs, and we all suffered slightly. We used less next time and didn't have any problems.

Thanks for the info on Sam's club SingleMom, I did look at them but by time I added shipping on, it was almost the same as just ordering from Augason Farms plus I only wanted one can while Sam's club was mostly twin packs. Too bad they don't carry these things in their locations, then it would be a really good deal. I mainly just got a few things I hadn't seen anywhere else like Honey Powder and Cream of Mushroom Soup.

Grainlady, you seem to really know your grains, what wheat is really best for like French/Italian white bread??? This has never been clear to me. EE's discription said that hard white wheat had a more delicate flavor than hard red and since I wasn't sure, I got buckets of both from them but would like to know before I buy any more! Thanks

kathya
12-17-2011, 01:50 AM
Thanks for clarifying Grainlady. My storage is at this time mostly "make from scratch" and I have the "magic mix" pages printed out - I think that they were from the Utah Preppers? They seem a good fit for me with lots of gluten free ideas ( I plan on doing clam chowder soon) and also seasoning mixes. I do need to add more to my storage though.

I have kefir grains and am now to the point of eating some of them. : /

I also have sprouting beans and once the holidays are over I'll try my hand at sprouting. Right now my small kitchen looks a little like a science experiement.

Also thanks for the url to the cheese blends/spices etc. It looks like they have several items that i can use and also for arepas (sp) I plan on trying that. Top of my list.

With all this in mind I can say that the Pamela's baking mix that i make on an occasional basis does cause gastric distress the next day. Maybe because i don't use it often and then eat all of the biscuits or maybe it just doesn't agree with me. (sigh) I really like having a biscuit.

Grainlady
12-17-2011, 09:13 AM
Grainlady, you seem to really know your grains, what wheat is really best for like French/Italian white bread??? This has never been clear to me. EE's discription said that hard white wheat had a more delicate flavor than hard red and since I wasn't sure, I got buckets of both from them but would like to know before I buy any more! Thanks

You will be making whole wheat French/Italian bread if you mill your own grain for flour, not "white bread". Always choose hard wheat for making yeast or naturally-leavened breads because it has the highest amount of gluten. I store both hard red and hard white wheat, but the taste of white wheat flour is more mild for those "I hate whole wheat" folks out there. I use red wheat for sprouts, wheatgrass, homemade bulgur or cracked wheat and farina (for making cooked cereal). When I cook whole wheat berries, I like to use a mixture of 1 part red wheat to 4 parts white wheat for some color and interest.

I also store soft white wheat (Bob's Red Mill) for milling "pastry" flour and for use for biscuits, quick breads - foods where you don't want a lot of gluten-development. For cake flour I use a 3:1 mix of soft white wheat and oat groats or spelt. For soft dinner rolls, 3:2 mix of hard wheat and soft wheat.

If all you have is hard wheat, you can still make other baked goods such as quick breads, biscuits, cookies, etc., but they will tend to be a little more tough than when you use a lower-gluten flour. You need to remember to keep mixing to a bare minimum with these recipes so you don't over-develop the gluten.

If you are new to baking bread, Artisan breads require some special techniques (I teach regular bread classes, bread-in-a-bag classes, Artisan Bread Classes, and Bread Machine Classes, as well as classes on milling your own flour - which includes a lot of information about grains/seeds/beans). For anyone new to bread baking, I'd suggest checking your local library for copies of Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day and Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day by Jeff Hertzberg, M.D., & Zoe Francois. You can also find information and recipes on their web site: http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/

For anyone who doesn't have a mill but would still like to use whole wheat berries, I'd suggest you purchase the little book No Wheat Grinder Wheat Recipes - by Cindi Van Bibber - http://cindislifestyletreasures.blogspot.com/ By using cooked whole wheat berries and a blender, you can make cakes, muffins, pancakes, cookies, main dishes, desserts.....

You can also use Magic Mix for making Cream of Mushroom Soup. This is the recipe I use (try half a recipe):

Magic Mix
2-1/3 c. dry powdered milk
1/2 c. cornstarch (or 1 c. all-purpose flour) (I use cornstarch.)
1 c. (2 sticks) butter at room temperature (I use 1 c. coconut oil - which makes this mix shelf-stable when stored in an air-tight container)

Combine ingredients in a bowl and with a hand-held electric mixer, blend the ingredients until it resembles cornmeal. If using butter, store in the freezer or refrigerator (up to 8-months).

Condensed Cream of Mushroom Soup
1 c. Magic Mix
1 can (4.5 oz.) mushroom pieces and stems, undrained
1/4 c. water
2 drops Kitchen Bouquet (optional for color only - you could also add a few drops of brewed coffee for color)
dash onion salt
dash pepper

Combine Magic Mix, mushrooms and liquid, and water. Stir constantly over medium-high heat until mixture thickens. Add Kitchen Bouquet, onion salt, and pepper. Use in any recipe calling for canned cream of mushroom soup. You will find more recipes at this link: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/publication/pub__3295363.pdf

beaniemaster2
12-17-2011, 11:45 AM
Printed the recipes, thank you and the site was awesome! Any ideas where I could get some soft wheat and especially Durham wheat for pasta where they don't kill you with shipping? Walton Feed has buckets of Durham for $27 but wants $41 for shipping! I would like to find someplace that has cans! EE has the soft wheat in buckets and no Durham at all.

Grainlady
12-17-2011, 02:21 PM
Shipping certainly kills you when it comes to grains, that's why it's important to find them as close to home as possible. The last time I purchased durum wheat I bought 50-pounds and got it from a health food co-op, several years ago, and I haven't priced it anywhere recently. If you have a "friendly" health food store, they may be able to order some for you. Our dinky mom & pop health food store will do that for me. If I purchase the amount they have to order (case of something, or entire 25# bag, etc.), they will sell it to me for 10% off - so be sure to ask for a discount.

I make noodles using durum wheat flour in bulk using a sourdough recipe - http://www.westonaprice.org/food-features/sourdough-egg-noodles, with powdered egg yolks (King Arthur Flour - http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/dried-whole-eggs-8-oz) and then dehydrate the noodles. Don't use fresh shell eggs if you are going to dehydrate them due to the potential for bacteria growth. Use pasteurized egg products (powdered eggs/yolks or Egg Beaters) for dehydrating noodles or pasta. You can also freeze the noodles if you don't want to dry them, in which case you can use fresh shell eggs.

Having durum wheat is not an important grain in storage because you can make perfectly good pasta and noodles with regular whole wheat flour.

I have a NutriMill, and for noodles I mill the durum into flour, and for pasta I mill it on the coarse grind that is recommended for cornmeal so the coarse grind resembles semolina flour - just a wholegrain version.

dconsa11
01-27-2012, 02:55 PM
Between Beaniemaster2 and Grainlady, I'm getting scared. If either of you or someone else who knows reads this please give me more information. The answers could be somewhere on this thread or elsewhere but I couldn't find it.

I purchased a lot of store sale items and put in Quart jars and seal with my foodsaver. Flour, surgar, rice, beans, etc. But I also purchased cereal like honey bunches of oats with almonds, and or strawberries and a few other kinds when they were on sale. We don't eat much cereal usually only oatmeal so I have lots of that in #10 cans. But once in a while, we love a bowl of cereal.

When you guys were talking about not storing brown surgar (which I have to look in my stock to see if I did that - I think I did) because of bacteria growth, I am now wondering about something like this type of cereal. I also have choc chips, etc. I don't see any of these items for really long term storage, but I was thinking about a year or so.

I was also going to start dehydrating apples, etc and either put them into the jars or bags. I have been putting my dehydrated vegies in bags also. I have not used any oxygen absorbers in either the foodsaver bags or the jars. Am I suppose to for longer storage? How long would these items last in the jars and bags.?

It is a bit confusing. I have read so much on this site but also on some dehydrating sites and seem to find different answers.


I have everything in a shed that in the winter stays around 40 -50. In the summer, we will add a small air conditioner to keep it at least 60

Am I going to poison us? (ha, ha) I really found it fun to store in jars and the bags and seal them, and it is a little less expensive for the most part. Just want to be on the right track!!

Grainlady
01-28-2012, 04:15 AM
dconsa11-

I agree, it is a bit confusing.... The key to vacuum-sealing foods using a FoodSaver or Oxygen Absorbers is to have 10% or less moisture. Or you can think of it as your "dry goods", dry being the operative word.

Have you been introduced to Wendy DeWitt and Everything Under the Sun? Her video series may be helpful to you, especially the part about vacuum-sealing food: http://allaboutfoodstorage.com/2009/05/wendy-dewitt-food-storage-presentation/

I'd suggest you wait until fall to dehydrate apples, when you can find them free-for-the-picking, or at least at a much lower price than they are now.

If you are vacuum-sealing flour, make sure it's in jars so it remains free-flowing. FoodSaver information in the user's manuals says there is enough moisture remaining in flour, if you seal it in a FoodSaver bag can begin to smell musty or moldy because it's so tightly packed. If you vacuum-seal it in jars, even though it's stored oxygen-free, it will remain free-flowing and won't develop a musty smell.

Hope that gives you some useful information on the subject...

beaniemaster2
01-28-2012, 02:11 PM
[QUOTE=dconsa11;5328]Between Beaniemaster2 and Grainlady, I'm getting scared.

Hahahahahahaha I had the exact same reaction dconsa11 and sure didn't mean to scare you!!! I didn't really know about high moisture foods but thanks to Grainlady and some research, I'm getting the hang of it! I did some pineapple and oranges and they took forever to dry and even after conditioning and drying again, they would still feel damp so I'm going to leave stuff like that to the experts unless we just eat it right away! I will try doing apples though! I'm with you, don't want to poison anybody!!! hahaha Like everything else, doing = experience :)

I don't really put oxygen obsorbers in my vacuum packed bags but still like to put them in the jars incase the seal comes loose (just my personal preference). I absolutely love my foodsaver, I have been vacuum packing everything! I have even been vacuum packing extra medications.

As far as the cereal goes, I would think it would be fine to vacuum pack but I would put in in jars, I would think the bags would crush it. When I did pastas, the noodles broke into tiny pieces but elbows held up well. I got alot of cerial on sale awhile back and just took it out of the boxes and put the bags into a bucket! Didn't do it for 'long term' but figured it might help keep it fresher alittle longer!

I am still learning but Grainlady has never steered me wrong yet and I have been so grateful for her advice and the professional links she supplies!

dconsa11
01-30-2012, 10:13 AM
Grainlady and Beniemaster2 --Thanks so much for your responses. This is definately a learning experience and I have received so much help from this site and others. Yes, Grainlady, I bookmarked Wendy's site, but haven't had too much time to go through everything. Will try to do so soon. Also, Beaniemaster - there is another site "dehydrate to store" that is good and she dryed very thin orange and lemon slices, as well and the rinds. She dried her apples to a very dry state, but other sites say not to overdry, just to a point that if you broke the slice in half and it is soft and dry. Anyway, there is so much information out there that is good, but ....... differences also.

I also did put my flour and sugar and cereal in jars. I also did dry some apples this weekend and am doing the "conditioning" thing now. (There was a special on some apples at the store this past week - but yes I'll wait till fall). It's been fun and it's like I want to try all things, but also need to do more study so I am not doing brown sugar again. :(